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Female samurais Why are they so desirable?

Female samurais Why are they so desirable?

Directed by Quentin Tarantino's new film, "Kill Bill" actress Uma Thurman plays assassin who ruthlessly pays back to her former colleagues, who include the Japanese underworld queen O-Ren Ishii (Lucy Liu). For this occasion, she asks one of the traditional Japanese martial artists to forge a sword, which she handled as deftly as a samurai. Female samurai - sounds a great way like a Hollywood. As if it was created by a combination of the warriors' bravery and beauty of a woman only to wake male observers’ admiration and lust. Japanese history, however, shows that such female warriors did indeed exist. Samurai status based on strict code of honor (they accounted for approx. 8% of Japan's population) could also include women, who belonged to Japanese elite in the society. It is known that in service for 13-14. -century feudal lords (daimyo) were also women who completed martial arts academy and were specialized mainly on kidnapping and espionage. The women’s, who were honored with samurai status, main task was to protect home against enemy attack. For this purposes they used mainly naginata, very effective cold weapon which was a cross between spear, sword and war axe. Even today they teach naginata handling in Japan as a classical female combat sports discipline.

 

Many naginata schools are related to the legendary Tomoe Gozen, lover of famous warrior Minamoto Yoshinaka, who lived in12th century. Gozen himself was feared samurai, who even fought on the battlefield. According to the legend she was extremely beautiful, extraordinarily strong and cruel who collected the heads of those she killed as trophies. Around the same time lived female samurai Hangaku, who was so skillful archer that any enemy hardly ever dared to attack her.

 

Female samurais were not only brave fight against the enemy but they even did not boggle at to the harakiri (ritual suicide) operations. In early spring at 1868th , after the imperial troops claimed the victory over especially dangerous clan of Aizu, they had fight with Aizu female samurais in the battle. The widows fought fearlessly under Nakamura Takeko’s leadership with three meters broad hatchets. When it was clear that the battle was lost, the women retreated and committed harakiri together with their children. Even today, in Japan they are still proud of any known female samurais amongst the ancestors.